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How Would You Describe Your Home?

November 14, 2017

You’re prepared to list your home for sale after months of cleaning, decluttering, depersonalizing, staging, photo taking…all very important. But how much consideration have you dedicated to the listing description?

 

 

When interviewing agents, why not ask them about their great listing description writing skills? It is perfectly acceptable to request examples of previous listing descriptions they’ve published. If you prefer to pen your own listing description, be sure to discuss this with your agent early on.

 

Some EB Real Estate suggestions for writing excellent listing descriptions:

 

Be Descriptive

Provide value to your listing. Avoid “you’ll love making memories in this home” and instead tell people about the specific features of your home. Talk about the brick patio that is perfect for get-togethers. Don’t talk about the “lovely outdoor area”, but illustrate the breathtaking and picturesque views from the second story balcony.

 

Don’t Be TOO Descriptive

Buyers want to learn about your property without reading a research paper. Studies show that right about 250 words is the sweet spot for successful listing descriptions, which is plenty for accentuating the greatest features of your home and property. Mention top reasons someone might wish to occupy your home and live in your neighborhood right away in the description.

 

Use Flashy Words

Another study revealed a word trend in listings that sold for above asking price. This type language is attractive to buyers, when used appropriately and accurately:

  • Luxurious

  • Captivating

  • Impeccable

  • Stainless

  • Landscaped

  • Granite

  • Nostalgic

  • Sophisticated

 

Avoid These…

Some words or phrases have proven to be either neutral, not evoking any positive emotions, or just plain bad. Common words discovered that are common of homes selling below asking price include:

  • Move-in ready

  • Clean

  • Motivated

  • Value

  • Cramped

  • Outdated

These words may not sound necessarily bad, but when you think about it in comparison to the good words listed previously, these feel flat and boring. They just don’t bring forth positive feelings. Also, avoid using exclamation points! Especially multiple exclamation points!!!!!!! Steer clear of USING ALL CAPS or inserting WeIrD cApItAliZaTioN, which appears unprofessional and spammy.

 

Use Brand Names

If appliances or features are well-known brand names, mention those brand names. Have an Ikea kitchen? Mention it! Upgraded smart home technology? Mention it!

 

Don’t Repeat Yourself….and Don’t Repeat Yourself

The Multiple Listing Service (MLS) will have a few things listed for your agent to insert, such as number of bedrooms, bathrooms, square footage, lot size, year built, etc. There is no reason to take up precious word space in the listing description by saying all of that again. However, if one of these features may possibly be the major selling point, it is justified to emphasize it in the description. For example, if the lot size is considerably larger than others in the area, it demands being called to buyers’ attention.

 

Make People Imagine

Adding just a few descriptive words can force people into their own imaginations, picturing themselves enjoying your home. Including information about the back deck of the home is ok, but what about the “private outdoor seating to enjoy peaceful mornings”? That description just about makes you want to enjoy a hot cup of coffee with the newspaper in hand, breathing in the fresh air.

 

2 Minds Are Greater Than 1

The best home listing descriptions are written with agent and home seller working together. Based on experience in the field, the agent can write descriptions to help the home sell, while the home seller adds in writing about unique qualities of the home that the agent may not know. It is perfectly acceptable to ask your agent to share his or her description prior to publishing the listing to ensure accuracy.

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